New report finds Ohio charter schools are failing

A new report from the Ohio School Boards Association, “Guide to Charter or Community Schools,” says that while it was hoped that the freedom and flexibility provided to charter and community schools would raise student achievement, 22 years after the charter movement began, such expectations have yet to be realized.

The guide reports that while a few charter or community schools are among the best schools in Ohio, most of the lowest performing schools are charter or community schools. More than 60 percent of Ohio’s charter or community schools were rated “D” or “F” on 2012-13 State Report Cards. Only 20 percent of Ohio’s traditional public schools were rated “D” or “F.” The majority of Ohio’s traditional schools—more than 50 percent—were rated “A” or “B.” The guide says that when only test scores—including SAT and ACT scores—are considered, traditional public schools consistently outperform charters across the nation.

The guide also reports that deeper analysis of the data shows that charter or community schools focusing on student achievement and discipline can improve low-income student performance.

The guide points out that every Ohio student that leaves a traditional public school to attend a charter or community school takes $5,800 in tax revenue with them every year, which would have gone to the student’s school district, reducing resources to fund traditional schools.

Margaret Suslick|May 14th, 2014|Categories: Charter Schools, Federal Advocacy, Public Advocacy|Tags: , , |

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