Articles in the Athletics category

Education Talk Radio previews NSBA’s 2013 Annual Conference

Kanisha Williams-Jones, Director of Leadership & Governance Services at the National School Boards Association (NSBA), was a guest today on Education Talk Radio providing a preview of NSBA’s 2013 Annual Conference. Thousands of school board members, administrators, and other educators will be coming to San Diego to take part in the April 13-15 event.

Listen to the broadcast:

Listen to internet radio with EduTalk on Blog Talk Radio

The conference will feature more than 200 sessions on timely education topics, including federal legislation and funding, managing schools with tight budgets, the legal implications of recent court cases, new research and best practices in school governance, and the Common Core State Standards. A series of sessions will focus on school safety and security.

Expanded education technology programming will include site visits to the University of San Diego and Qualcomm’s Mobile Learning Center to explore its research laboratory on mobile learning; Birch Aquarium at Scripps Institution of Oceanography to examine the technology in science education and STEM; Encinitas Union School District to view its One-to-One Digital Learning Program; and the San Diego Zoo to learn about the cutting-edge learning tools used to teach at-risk students. U.S. Navy SEALs will show leadership and team building skills during another workshop.

The meeting also includes one of the largest K-12 educational expositions, with some 300 companies showcasing their innovative products and services for school districts.

General Session speakers include Academy Award winning speaker Geena Davis, who will be speaking about her work off-screen as founder of the non-profit Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media. Davis works with film and television creators to reduce gender stereotyping and increase the number of female characters in media targeted for children 11 and under. She will explain how media plays a key role in children’s development, and how her organization is making a difference.

Television star Neil deGrasse Tyson, one of the world’s most engaging and passionate science advocates, will headline Sunday’s General Session. From PBS to NASA to Presidential Commissions, organizations have depended on Tyson’s down-to-earth approach to astrophysics. He has been a frequent guest on “The Daily Show”, “The Colbert Report”, R”eal Time with Bill Maher”, and “Jeopardy!”. Tyson hopes to reach “all the people who never knew how much they’d love learning about space and science.”

Monday’s General Session features acclaimed researcher and author Diane Ravitch, who has become one of the most passionate voices for public schools. Her most recent book, The Death and Life of the Great American School System: How Testing and Choice Are Undermining Education, makes the case that public education today is in peril and offers a clear prescription for improving public schools.

Learn more about the common core standards, new research on differentiated learning styles, and teaching “unteachable” children at the Focus On lecture series. Learn about new technologies for your classrooms as part of the Technology + Learning programs.

It’s not too late to register, visit the Annual Conference website for  more information.

NSBA’s 2013 Annual Conference to feature Geena Davis, Neil deGrasse Tyson, and Diane Ravitch

Registration and housing for the National School Boards Association’s (NSBA) 73rd Annual Conference, to be held April 13 to 15 in San Diego, is now open. Join more than 5,000 school board members and administrators for an event with hundreds of sessions, workshops, and exhibits that will help your school district programs and help you hone your leadership and management skills.

General Session speakers include Academy Award winning speaker Geena Davis, who will be speaking about her work off-screen as founder of the non-profit Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media. Davis works with film and television creators to reduce gender stereotyping and increase the number of female characters in media targeted for children 11 and under. She will explain how media plays a key role in children’s development, and how her organization is making a difference.

Television star Neil deGrasse Tyson, one of the world’s most engaging and passionate science advocates, will headline Sunday’s General Session. From PBS to NASA to Presidential Commissions, organizations have depended on Tyson’s down-to-earth approach to astrophysics. He has been a frequent guest on “The Daily Show”, “The Colbert Report”, R”eal Time with Bill Maher”, and “Jeopardy!”. Tyson hopes to reach “all the people who never knew how much they’d love learning about space and science.”

Monday’s General Session features acclaimed researcher and author Diane Ravitch, who has become one of the most passionate voices for public schools. Her most recent book, The Death and Life of the Great American School System: How Testing and Choice Are Undermining Education, makes the case that public education today is in peril and offers a clear prescription for improving public schools.

Learn more about the common core standards, new research on differentiated learning styles, and teaching “unteachable” children at the Focus On lecture series. Learn about new technologies for your classrooms as part of the Technology + Learning programs.

Special discounted rates are available for early registrants who sign up by Jan. 10, 2013. NSBA National Affiliate and Technology Leadership Network Districts save even more.

View the conference brochure for more details. Be sure to check the Annual Conference website for updates and more information.

 

 

What would you do if parents lobbied your school board on adding athletic offerings

The August edition of ASBJ ‘s Adviser Poll poses this question to our readers:

A group of parents lobbied the school board to make archery one of the athletic offerings at the high school level. Their middle school children were very involved with the sport and they wanted them to continue in junior and varsity teams at the high school. The school board was hesitant because of the costs but the parents promised they would raise money to cover the expenses. What should the board do?

Vote and tell us what you think on our Facebook page.

 

Naomi Dillon|July 31st, 2012|Categories: American School Board Journal, Athletics, School Boards|Tags: , , |

NATA brings message of sports safety to Hill

Members of the National Association of Athletic Trainers will be in Washington, DC on Friday for the association’s annual “Capitol Hill Day,” where they hope to educate members of Congress about the athletic training profession and request support for athletic safety and physical activity legislation.

The day also marks the kickoff of National Athletic Training Month which takes place each March and will boast the theme “Athletic Trainers Save Lives.”

Indeed, high school athletes suffer 2 million injuries, have 500,000 doctor visits and 30,000 hospitalizations every year – and 40 young athletes have died from sports injuries so far this year according to NATA.

And yet only 42 percent of high schools are staffed with athletic trainers, health care professionals who specialize in the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of injuries and sport-related illnesses and as such are in the unique position to act quickly when an athlete goes down on the field.

NATA and its members have been instrumental in heightening awareness around youth concussions, which ASBJ chronicled in its August 2011 issue.

And this month, NATA published a position statement that outlines the top 10 major health conditions and causes of sudden death among young athletes, along with updated recommendations to ensure better prevention and treatment of youth sport injuries.

“This is the first time NATA has provided this condensed information in one document to help medical professionals, coaches, parents and others make more effective and efficient return to play and care decisions,” remarked Marjorie J. Albohm, NATA’s president.

 

Naomi Dillon|February 23rd, 2012|Categories: American School Board Journal, Athletics|Tags: , , |

Concussion prevention laws, practices spreading

Recent news headlines have highlighted a proliferation of youth concussion prevention regulations and strategies across the country.

From Arizona, which apparently is the first state to require student athletes to pass a test based on a traumatic brain injury video they must watch, to Virginia, which became one of nearly two dozen states to write concussion prevention among students into law in the past six months.

In the August edition of ASBJ, I tackled the issue of youth concussions, which remains a largely misunderstood injury.  Among one of the more intriguiging revelations in the story: restricting physical exertion of injured student is only half the battle– in fact, it’s even less.

“We spend 90 percent of our time in the clinic, around how to return that kid to school,” Gerald Gioa, chief of neuropsychology at  Children’s National Medical Center in Washington D.C., told me. “The sports side is the easy part. I can easily restrict sports it’s not so easy to restrict the academic side.”

To learn more about this serious, yet highly preventable injury, read the August cover story, online for free for a limited time.

Naomi Dillon, Senior Editor

 

Naomi Dillon|August 17th, 2011|Categories: American School Board Journal, Athletics, Crisis Management, Wellness|

New on ASBJ.com

The August edition of ASBJ, now online,  arrives at the same time many school athletic programs are gearing up. And while we wish every team a great season, our main concern and our cover package, is focused on keeping students safe. Toward this end, the cover story provides some insight on youth concussions, which despite growing attention and state legislation, remains a largely misunderstood injury.  A tandem article, written by Orange County Superintendent of Schools William Habermehl, provides a first-hand account of the risks and precautions that districts and schools need to take to protect their student athletes. Rounding out the series is an examination of another athletic safeguard of sorts— booster club funds, which increasingly subsidize athletic participation at schools. Read these and other great features from the August issue, now available online.

Naomi Dillon|August 2nd, 2011|Categories: American School Board Journal, Athletics|Tags: , , , , |

Put down the taco and go outside

There are a lot of conversations about childhood obesity these days—specifically, what parents and schools can and should be doing to help lower the statistic that about one-third of children and teens are overweight. Much of the attention centers on the quality and quantities of food young people are being fed. Congress is planning changes to the Child Nutrition Act. The Senate passed legislation late last week that would increase the standards for all foods sold in schools, from school cafeterias to vending machines, and instill a large number of new requirements.

But it’s not just what we eat, it’s also what we do, or don’t do. A new study by the National Wildlife Federation shows that kids today spend much less time outdoors than their parents, now that computers, video games, and television seem to have taken over our lives. Today’s kids spend an average of more than seven hours a day using electronic devices — and they spend half as much time outdoors as they did just 20 years ago.

Children who go outside for play are more active and less likely to be overweight, more creative in their play, less aggressive, and more focused, the report says.

We know every child is not destined or interested in trying out for the basketball team or running track—but that doesn’t mean they won’t find a sport they’ll enjoy, perhaps even a team sport at school.

An article in ASBJ’s August issue looks at some of the “emerging” school sports that are getting kids off the sofa—badminton, bowling, flag football, and a host of other activities. Soccer has been rising steadily since the 1980s, particularly in ethnic communities, and now the popularity of lacrosse is spreading beyond its traditional areas in the Northeast.

None of these are close to the popularity of football, track and volleyball—but the good news is that they offer an alternative to video games.

Joetta Sack-Min, Associate Editor

Kathleen Vail|August 9th, 2010|Categories: American School Board Journal, Athletics, Governance, NSBA Publications, Wellness|

Can schools help solve the obesity crisis?

Health is the word in the August issue of American School Board Journal, just posted on our website. The cover article by Senior Editor Naomi Dillon looks at how increased national attention, including from the White House, is influencing how school districts and communities are helping students and their families get and stay healthy and fit. Dillon traveled to Huntington, W.Va., a town that won the dubious honor of being the fatest city in the U.S. several years ago. The Huntington schools, along with community partners, took up the challenge to encourage good health and eating habits among children and adults.
Do you believe that the war on underage use of tobacco has been won? You might want to rethink that notion after reading Senior Editor Del Stover’s article on how tobacco companies are using different products and marketing techniques on your students.
ASBJ’s cover package is open for a month for all everyone, including those who don’t subscribe. Subcribers can read the entire issue, as well as search past issues and use our topical archives.

Kathleen Vail|July 29th, 2010|Categories: American School Board Journal, Athletics, NSBA Publications, Wellness|

Goooooooooooooooooooaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaallllllllll!

296-1244490483sgKzI’ve never really followed soccer … to be honest, I’ve really never followed any professional sport or team with much regularity.

Perhaps it’s our country’s growing fondness for “futbol” or maybe my expanding network of international friends, but it seems like the countdown and the inevitable Friday finale to the World Cup is all I seem to hear about lately.

I must admit, there is something to be said about the excitement and energy that can engulf a community when teams duke it out in a championship game. It actually reminds me of an ASBJ story I wrote a few years back on, of all things, diversity and immigration and how each impacted schools.
(more…)

Naomi Dillon|July 7th, 2010|Categories: American School Board Journal, Athletics, Governance|Tags: , , , |

A wealth of information at our health and wellness archive

Summer is nearly here, and for most of us, it’s a time when we’re usually a more physically active than at other times of the year. Students are outside more, elementary schools are holding field days, and the pools are open.

If you’re a subscriber, you get access to our archives all the time. (And if you’re not a subscriber, why not?) In honor of the summer season, go to our  Health and Wellness archive.

The archive is full of interesting and informative articles on universal breakfast, school leader stress, keeping employees healthy, the school leaders’ role in school health, the link between student achievement and physical activity and nutrition, and many others.

But don’t take my word for it. Check it out for yourself at http://www.asbj.com/TopicsArchive/HealthandWellness.aspx.

Kathleen Vail|June 2nd, 2010|Categories: American School Board Journal, Athletics, NSBA Publications, Wellness|
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