Articles in the Board governance category

U.S. Department of Education official discusses federal education priorities with NSBA

A top federal official outlined the U.S. Department of Education’s priorities and upcoming initiatives at the National School Boards Association’s (NSBA) 2013-14 Board of Directors meeting on Dec. 6, 2013.

Deborah S. Delisle, Assistant Secretary for the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education (OESE), oversees more than 100 prek-12 programs, including early learning, accountability, mental health, literacy, civic education, and school safety; as well as programs for disadvantaged students, including Title I, and programs for homeless and migrant students.

Delisle emphasized the need for local control and flexibility as she spoke to the group of school board leaders and NSBA staff. She discussed topics including flexibility to the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA)—and noted that there currently there are 37 separate accountability systems. She also touched on college affordability and funding; the increasing number of homeless kids in college; and school climate and safety, including the agency’s Project Serve.

Delisle also discussed the disparate suspension rates among students living in poverty and students with disabilities, a topic of interest to NSBA. She referred to evidence in civil rights data collected by the agency–as an example she spoke of a school that suspended an African-American kindergartener for five days for pulling a fire alarm; a similar incident in another school resulted in a one-day suspension for a student who was white.

And Delisle pointed to the December 2012 shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Conn., as an example of the need for enhanced mental health support.

The Department of Education also is examining ongoing “opportunity and expectation gaps,” and the ongoing need to deal responsibly with equity issues, she noted in her remarks.

NSBA is represented by Executive Director Thomas J. Gentzel in bi-monthly meetings with top Department of Education officials and leading education organizations, which include AASA, the School Superintendents Association, National Association of Elementary School Principals, Council of Chief State School Officers, National Association of State Boards of Education, and the National Association of Secondary School Principals. The meetings serve as a platform for the groups’ executive leadership to convene to discuss various issues, share new policy and update the entire group on happenings within each organization.

 

 

Joetta Sack-Min|December 6th, 2013|Categories: Board governance, Educational Legislation, Elementary and Secondary Education Act, Federal Advocacy, Federal Programs, Leadership, Legislative advocacy, Policy Formation|Tags: , , |

NSBA teaches architects about school boards at EdSpaces event

Thomas J. Gentzel, Executive Director of the National School Boards Association (NSBA), will deliver an education session at EdSpaces in San Antonio on December 4. The session “Presenting Proposals to School Boards” is aimed at architects and dealers bidding on school design projects to help them bring the proper attention to their firm’s capabilities and expertise.

The start of a new school building project begins with a proposal to the school board that explains an architect’s vision for the site and how it will meet the needs of the student and educator population. Gentzel will provide advice on what architects and designers can do to set themselves apart from their competition and avoid costly mistakes.

“It’s important for architects and designers to understand not only the role of the school board but also the needs of the local community,” Gentzel said. “A school board may want to incorporate features such as environmentally friendly design or build areas for their community’s use, and architects must be able to decifer their needs and deliver those on what are always tight budgets.”

Gentzel noted that a school construction project is a major endeavor for any school district, and districts want designs that will be adaptable in coming decades.

“We’re delighted that NSBA is contributing education content that will help school leaders make the best decision for educational facilities of the future,” says Jim McGarry, President/CEO of NSSEA. “With over 120 school districts attending EdSpaces, school board members will be meeting with the vendors, dealers, architects and designers to discuss how trends are affecting the solutions available for today’s learning spaces.”

The National School Supply and Equipment Association (NSSEA) produces EdSpaces, which is designed as the destination for school district and college officials to meet with manufacturers, dealers, architects, designers, and facilities planners to explore the impact of facilities on learning, discover new products and plan the Pre-K through higher education learning environments of tomorrow. EdSpaces includes a CEU-accredited education conference, led by many of the world’s top architects and designers, and focused on state-of-the-art, sustainable design and creative design/construction solutions. The EdSpaces exhibit hall showcases the most diverse range of innovative products for students of all ages.

For more information on this year’s event, held Dec. 4-6, 2013 in San Antonio, visit www.Ed-Spaces.com.

Joetta Sack-Min|December 4th, 2013|Categories: Board governance, Budgeting, Conferences and Events, School Boards, School Buildings, School Security|Tags: , , |

Veteran school board lobbyist retires after 44-year career at NSBA

When Michael A. Resnick joined the National School Boards Association as a legislative specialist in 1969, Richard Nixon was president. Neil Armstrong walked on the moon. The U.S. Army began pulling troops out of Vietnam, and Jimi Hendrix sang at Woodstock.

And most Americans believed the nation’s public education system was the best in the world.

Over the next 44 years, much would change — and not just for the nation at large. In the realm of education, Resnick, who is retiring this week as head of NSBA’s Office of Federal Advocacy and Public Policy, has witnessed profound changes in state and federal education policy and in the challenges facing school boards nationwide.

Some of those changes were promising, such as the higher priority the nation placed on the academic success of all students, particularly the most disadvantaged and traditionally underserved. Slowly but persistently, the public schools raised student academic performance, narrowed the achievement gap between white and minority students, and raised high school graduation rates to a historic high.

Other changes, however, have been less welcome. Critics of public education have eroded confidence in our public education system. State and federal mandates have been increasingly intrusive and even damaging. Top-down reform efforts have undermined local school governance.

All of this has had an enormous impact on the roles and expectations of the nation’s more than 14,000 school boards, Resnick says.

“If you go back to the 1960s and 1970s, school boards generally served a trustee role, overseeing the budget, making sure finances were in good order, overseeing personnel and student matters — but leaving to the school district administration with limited authority over much of what went on in the educational program.”

That limited role for the school board gave way over the years as the nation embarked on a decades-long debate about student academic performance. No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) put academic accountability at the forefront of state and federal policy.

“While board members aren’t designing or running their schools’ academic program,” he says, “they certainly have to be familiar with it at a pretty technical level — so they can respond to issues surrounding student achievement and the need to meet accountability requirements for the school district.”

NCLB had good intentions, Resnick says, but it brought about a seismic shift in the federal government’s role in education policymaking. States and school boards had long been subject to federal rules in order to participate in categorical programs such as Title I.

However, NCLB mandated states to enact more sweeping and prescriptive policies and requirements that had a direct impact on districts overall and on how boards did their work.

That federal overreach has continued under the Race to the Top program, which offers the promise of significant federal aid to states that agree to enact policies favored by federal education officials.

NSBA has been fighting overreach of top-down policy direction, he says, making clear to Congress and U.S. Department of Education officials that the flood of mandates and regulations are increasingly onerous and limit the flexibility of school officials.

But there are other forces at work, making it harder for advocates of local school governance to influence state and federal policymaking, Resnick says. “Back in the 1960s and 1970s, the principal players in state legislatures and on Capitol Hill were the institutional professional education groups — those representing teachers, administrators, and school boards.”

Today, however, there are a host of new advocacy groups making their voices heard — ideology-driven think tanks, industry-backed advocacy groups, business leaders, and other special interests.

These new groups make it more difficult for the institutional associations to be heard, Resnick says. One of the more damaging policy directions that some groups have encouraged is to promote alternatives to the traditional public school system, he says.

Supported by business interests that hope to tap into the billions of dollars spent on education, these groups have helped accelerate state and federal policies in support of vouchers and charter schools.

NSBA has “had to find ways to increase our effectiveness in terms of the knowledge we can bring to the table but also raise our level of advocacy,” he says.

Resnick’s earliest strategies to strengthen NSBA’s advocacy was the creation of the Federal Relations Network (FRN) in 1970 — an initiative to enlist school board members as outspoken constituents of their federal House and Senate members.

Today, NSBA is working to expand the number of board members participating in legislative advocacy, Resnick says. NSBA also has launched the National School Boards Action Center, designed to broaden school board advocacy to impact Congress, the media, and the public. The center includes the Friends of Public Education network to bring together other local leaders and concerned citizens to advocate on behalf of public education and sound federal policies.

“With the increase in competing voices in the policymaking debate, it becomes harder for your voice to be heard,” he says. “It requires marshalling a different set of resources, and the level of information you must provide has to be greater, as does the level of political punch behind you.”

It doesn’t help the cause of school boards, however, that Congress is politically deadlocked and struggling to fulfill its responsibilities, he says. Federal lawmakers have failed to adopt an annual federal budget for several years and the long-overdue reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) still is winding its way through the legislative process.

“Years ago, it was a time of more predictable, orderly policymaking on Capitol Hill, without the partisan rancor of today,” he says. “The political parties had different views, but compromise and accommodations could be made. One role of NSBA was to help broker those compromises.”

The political stalemate in Congress has created a vacuum in federal policy-making — one that the Education Department is too willing to fill with rigid regulations that are eroding local policymakers’ authority, Resnick notes. But, whatever the merits of any particular policy initiative, the department’s efforts lack the level of accountability or public input that would occur if federal policies were under the legislative oversight of Congress.

“What we see is an overreach of authority from the Department of Education — not only in terms of the federal role but also in the role of the agency itself,” he says.

That’s why NSBA earlier this year proposed the Local School Board Governance and Flexibility Act, designed to protect local school districts from unnecessary and counter-productive federal regulations. Key provisions of this legislative proposal were incorporated into the House of Representatives’ bill to reauthorize ESEA, which passed in July.

Yet there is much more to be done, Resnick says. NSBA will be working more closely than ever with state school boards associations to support their advocacy efforts in state legislatures and courts “because that’s where many of the policy debates have gone — to the state level.”

As he steps down after four decades advocating on behalf of school boards, Resnick expresses some worry that the next generation of school board members may come to see the current state and federal intrusion into local policymaking as the norm, rather than a recent development that runs counter to the traditional policy of local school control.

“Over time, if we continue in this current framework, without knowing the history and evolution of recent education policymaking, we may find that new school board members assume it has to be this way,” he says. “But there are better approaches — emphasizing local school governance — with tools to increase student achievement with less top-down management.”

Del Stover|November 26th, 2013|Categories: American School Board Journal, Board governance, Educational Legislation, Elementary and Secondary Education Act, Featured, Federal Advocacy, Federal Programs, National School Boards Action Center, NSBA Publications, NSBAC|Tags: |

NSBA caucus chair receives national school board award

The National School Boards Association (NSBA) congratulates Tawana Lynn Keels, who was named the 2013 School Board Member of the Year Award by the National Alliance of Black School Educators. The award was given at the group’s annual conference in Detroit.

Keels is the chair of NSBA’s National Black Caucus of School Board Members (NBC), a national membership organization dedicated to meeting and addressing the educational needs of African-American students. Keels is also the President of the Princeton City School’s Board of Education in Ohio, where she has served since 1996, and a member of the Board of Directors of Great Oaks Institute of Technology and Career Development.

Joetta Sack-Min|November 19th, 2013|Categories: Announcements, Board governance|Tags: , , |

NSBA promotes new vision statement for future of public schools

The National School Boards Association (NSBA) has unveiled a new vision statement, “elevator speech,” and guiding principles, important aspects of a unified framework that helps education leaders become better advocates and boosts NSBA’s presence as a leading advocate for public education and school board governance.

A School Board Vision for Public Education

NSBA unveils ” A School Board Vision for Public Education”

The documents were written by NSBA’s Board of Directors to help NSBA members as well as members of the general public advocate effectively for public education.

The Board-approved unified framework aims to build NSBA’s ‘army of advocates’ and influence key federal legislative issues, NSBA Executive Director Thomas J. Gentzel said in a video showcasing the new documents.

“School boards are different than any other player in the education community,” Gentzel said. “We are not a special interest, our local school board members are elected officials and they have a responsibility to stand up in the community and say ‘here’s what we think needs to happen.’”

Advocates can use the statement and principles in their messages to Congress and the public, as well as to aggressively pursue NSBA’s federal agenda, deal with an emerging environment in Congress, address critical priorities in education and school governance, and promote key strengths of NSBA.

A comprehensive statement entitled “A School Board Vision for Public Education,” lays out the vision and results that public schools should achieve. Those include accountability for the success of each child, closing the achievement gap, continuously meeting high expectations for student achievement and community satisfaction, and providing a safe learning environment that focuses on individualized instruction and protecting the civil rights of each child.

To do this, public schools need capacity to provide effective teachers, technology, and other resources; the necessary funding, research, and technical assistance to meet the educational demands of a dynamic world; active participation by parents and the community; locally elected school boards who work with the community and educators; and state and federal lawmakers who are committed to public education and the goals of their local schools.

A concise “elevator speech” highlights key tenets of the larger NSBA vision statement. NSBA also is printing pocket-size laminate cards for distribution at upcoming meetings and events.

The final part of the unified framework, “Guiding Principles for Implementation,” frames the development of specific resolutions in three key areas: Public Education, Local School Board Governance, and Equity and Excellence in Education.

Watch the video:

Joetta Sack-Min|November 7th, 2013|Categories: Announcements, Board governance, Leadership, Legislative advocacy, School Boards, School Reform|Tags: , , , |

Gentzel: School boards needed for strong American democracy

A strong public education system–governed by locally elected or appointed school boards–is necessary to continue our nation’s prosperity and our democratic society, National School Boards Association Executive Director Thomas J. Gentzel told attendees at a symposium titled “Improving Schools through Board Governance.”

NSBA Executive Director Thomas J. Gentzel speaks at the University of Georgia on October 22.

NSBA Executive Director Thomas J. Gentzel speaks at the University of Georgia on October 22.

Gentzel was keynote speaker at the Oct. 22 event, which was sponsored by the University of Georgia and designed to bring together school board members, superintendents, community members and other educators to discuss school governance issues.

The nation’s 90,000 school board members are committed to student achievement and helping guide the next generation to fulfilling and productive lives, Gentzel said.

He also discussed NSBA’s framework, “The Key Work of School Boards,” which guides school boards toward better leadership skills and ways to improve student achievement through governance.

Gentzel also lauded the “Vision for Public Education Project,” which was created by the Georgia School Boards Association (GSBA) and the Georgia Superintendents Association. The project built a framework based on seven core principles for improving the educational experience for public school students. GSBA also has written standards for the state’s school boards, which have been adapted with some revisions by the state board of education.

 

Joetta Sack-Min|October 25th, 2013|Categories: Board governance, Key Work of School Boards, Leadership, School Reform, State School Boards Associations, Uncategorized|Tags: , , , |

NSBA board member Kevin Ciak honored by New Jersey school boards

The New Jersey School Boards Association (NJSBA) has announced Kevin E. Ciak the New Jersey Board of Education Member of the Year for 2013. Ciak is a 19-year member of the Sayreville Board of Education, who was elected to his first term the year after he graduated from the district’s high school.Ciak_ 2013-2014_Ciak

Ciak is also a Northeast Region delegate to the National School Boards Association (NSBA) Board of Directors and an appointee to the NSBA Executive Committee.

“Kevin has been an incredible school board member in the state of New Jersey for almost two decades,” said John Bulina, NJSBA president. “His dedication to students has been recognized at the regional and national levels. He has been a mentor and a good friend to me and to many of the officers of the New Jersey School Boards Association.”

Dr. Lawrence S. Feinsod, NJSBA executive director, echoed Bulina’s sentiments. “Kevin embodies all the best qualities of school board members; he has devoted himself to the students in his district, while also advocating for public education at the county, state and federal levels. Without doubt, Kevin Ciak is the quintessential advocate for educational excellence. He truly cares about the quality of the education that our young people receive. I offer my sincere congratulations on this honor.”

Ciak, who was characterized by school board officials in Sayreville and Middlesex County as the “voice of reason,” will be presented with the award at Workshop 2013 in Atlantic City.

“He is that leader who garners respect, as Kevin gives respect and appreciation to others. He builds consensus,” said Middlesex County School Boards Association President Catherine Sucher Greeley, a school board member in nearby Piscataway, who nominated Ciak. “He is a problem solver: The calm in a storm, whether a heated discussion or a stalemate.”

Sayreville Board President Michael Macagnone described Ciak as a board member who steps forward to lead discussion on issues ranging from elementary re-districting to policy updating.

“Kevin has continually been the one who keeps the board focused on the issue,” Macagnone said. “(He) exudes confidence and is the perfect example of what a board member should be –intelligent, dedicated, honest and a team player.”

Ciak was elected to the Sayreville board in 1994, the year after graduating from Sayreville War Memorial High School. Elected seven times, Ciak is currently vice president of Sayreville’s board, and previously spent six years as board president. As well as serving as NJSBA president from 2006 to 2008, he has been on the NJSBA Legislative, Nominating, Finance, Executive, and numerous other committees, and is actively involved in the Middlesex County School Boards Association.

Ciak said he first got interested in public service as a high school junior, when he was selected for American Legion Jersey Boy’s State, a weeklong program on government and politics, where students run for elected office. “I had a great time and learned a lot. I thought, ‘what can I do with this?’ I decided that August to attend my first school board meeting,” Ciak recalled.

A year later, while a freshman at Rutgers University, he ran for the Sayreville board and won.

Ciak has published articles and been interviewed on television about school board leadership. He is president of the Middlesex County Arts and Education Council, and a past member of the Sayreville Human Relations Commission.

Earlier this year he traveled to Finland with the National School Boards Association, at his own expense, to study that nation’s well-regarded public schools.

Ciak, who holds a degree in electrical engineering and works in global-supply-chain finance, called the School Board Member of the Year award a “huge honor.”

“To have my own peers select me is truly an honor,” he said.

While Ciak said public schools face many more demands than when he began nearly 20 years ago, he said he plans to continue serving.

“I really love the profession. I love working with kids, working with my fellow board members,” he said. “Every day, you never know what new problem you’re going to be dealt. Even after 20 years on the board, I can’t say I’ve seen it all.

“It’s a challenge every single day,” he said.

Given annually since 2005, the School Board Member of the Year award honors an individual board member who makes significant contributions; exemplifies leadership in the field of education with a strong commitment to the children of New Jersey; demonstrates a strong commitment to his or her personal and professional development as a board member; and shows active involvement in school governance at the local, county and state levels.

Nominations for the honor were judged by an independent panel from the Pennsylvania School Boards Association.

Staff|October 23rd, 2013|Categories: Announcements, Board governance, NSBA Recognition Programs, State School Boards Associations|Tags: , |

Ravitch: We can learn a lot from Finland — and from our own public schools

Diane Ravitch praised the Finnish schools in a recent speech in Washington, D.C. But it was another nation’s public education system — and the remarkable progress it has made over the past 40 years — that most impressed the celebrated author and education historian.

What country is this? The United States, of course. During that time, student achievement has increased overall, even as today’s student population has become more racially, economically, and culturally diverse. Graduation rates also are rising. And “dropout rates,” said Ravitch, a keynote speaker at NSBA’s 2013 Annual Conference in San Diego, “are the lowest they’ve been in history.”

But if you read some of the anti-public school literature out there, or watched some purportedly “balanced” news reports, you could easily be fooled into thinking something much different, said Ravitch, who spoke at the Economic Policy Institute about her new book on public school reform, Reign of Error.

As an example, Ravitch cited a 2012 report called “U.S. Education Reform and National Security,” by former U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and former New York City Schools Chancellor Joel I. Klein, now head of Rupert Murdoch’s strongly pro-voucher News Corp. The report claims, contrary to the evidence Ravitch cites in the Long-Term Trend report of National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), that U.S. schools are so bad they have “become a grave security risk.”

Ravitch devotes much of her new book to the high performing public schools in Finland, a place where she says teaching is a highly respected — and highly selective — occupation, where teachers and principals belong to a common union, and where public education of the highest quality is seen as a national obligation.

“They don’t have charters,” Ravitch said. “They don’t have vouchers. …. There is no Teach for Finland.”

U. S. schools are doing a lot right, too, Ravitch said. In fact, some of the highest-scoring nations on international tests — Singapore among them – are looking at how U.S. schools embrace creativity and teach problem-solving skills. Ironically, with the recent emphasis on high-stakes testing, she added, “We’re moving in the opposite direction.”

“And now we have kindergarten children taking bubble-in tests,” Ravitch said. “This is insane.”

Ravitch criticized the Obama administration’s Race to the Top program, which she said “has put $5 billion into the pursuit of higher test scores.” She said the money could have been put to better use in efforts to address the growing segregation of many public schools by race and income, particularly in the South and West.

“We’re not trying to solve the real problem, which is child poverty,” Ravitch said. “Poverty is the elephant in the room.”

Elaine Weiss, national coordinator for the Broader Bolder Approach to Education, and Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers, also spoke at the event. Weingarten said budget cuts have harmed school systems across the country, opening them up to criticism and threats of privatization. However, studies consistently show that privatization does not lead to higher student performance while resulting, in many instances, in greater economic and racial segregation.

Lawrence Hardy|October 22nd, 2013|Categories: 21st Century Skills, Board governance, Charter Schools, Comparative Education, Conferences and Events, Curriculum, Diversity, NSBA Annual Conference 2013, Privatization, Race to the Top (RTTT), School Board News, School Vouchers, Student Achievement, Student Engagement|

GSBA director gives guidance on choosing school board members

On Nov. 5, Atlanta voters will select school board members to oversee the local schools and education of the city’s children. Atlanta is unique because all nine of its seats are up for election at the same time, and this year several incumbents have chosen not to run for reelection, which creates the possibility of a completely new board.

Georgia School Boards Association Executive Director Jeannie M. “Sis” Henry penned an editorial for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution on Oct. 19 that explains why school board elections are so important.

She wrote, “School board races often tend to generate little attention or momentum. However, the decisions made by school boards often affect virtually every important aspect of local schools from school boundaries to bus schedules, curriculum to clubs and even funding field trips… Many of the day-to-day responsibilities for which school boards are responsible generally are delegated to the superintendent. However, in Georgia, responsibilities of a public school board also include but are not limited to some duties that cannot be delegated, such as:

  • The hiring and firing of the local school system superintendent,
  • Buying and selling school property (including the power of condemnation),
  • Calling elections to authorize a Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax and bond elections to authorize the issuance of bonded debt,
  • Making the policies and rules necessary to govern the school system,
  • Reorganization and consolidation of schools within their control and
  • Authority to hire employees on the recommendation of the superintendent.

Henry also posed a series of questions for voters to consider a school board candidates’ qualities, skills and experience. Those include:

  • What is the candidate’s vision and goals for high academic achievement for all students?
  • Does the candidate inspire parents and other stakeholders to have confidence in the local public schools?
  • Does the candidate understand that the school board’s role is about the big picture, setting the direction for the district and providing oversight and accountability rather than the day-to-day management (micro-management)?
  • Does the candidate focus on a single issue or is he or she concerned about all the issues that come before the board?
  • Does the candidate’s approach make it likely that he or she will be able to work effectively with the rest of the board to get things done?

Henry also urges Atlanta voters to weigh their votes carefully and scrutinize the backgrounds of candidates. Voters should “thoroughly understand what each individual brings to the board in terms of expertise and their willingness to collaborate and work as a team.”

The original editorial is available only through subscription to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Joetta Sack-Min|October 21st, 2013|Categories: Board governance, School Boards, State School Boards Associations|Tags: |

NSBA leaders bring local school boards message to NBC’s Education Nation

National School Boards Association (NSBA) leaders participated in NBC’s Education Nation Summit this week, bringing NSBA’s message that local governance matters to a wide audience that included governors, foundations, business leaders, researchers and practitioners.

This year’s summit incorporated a student-centered “What it Takes” theme, with panel discussions on how to ensure all students are prepared for success in K-12, higher education, and careers. NSBA Executive Director Thomas J. Gentzel and President David A. Pickler were among the more than 300 attendees invited to the event.

“Innovation was a persistent theme at Education Nation,” said Gentzel. “Some of the best presenters were young people who, in demonstrating their creativity, also served as great testimonials for the public education system that provided the training and opportunities for them to explore and develop exciting new ideas.”

Gentzel added that another significant theme that public schools are accomplishing great things but the expectations and needs are growing. However, he added, there needs to be more emphasis on the local leadership to make these achievements possible.

During an Oct. 8 panel featuring governors, Gov. Steve Beshear of Kentucky answered a question posed by Pickler, noting the role of local school boards in school improvement. Beshear also stated that charter schools should be authorized by local school boards, which can determine if those schools are needed.

Pickler also lauded the event’s emphasis on early learning and pre-K. In particular, he praised Secretary of Education Arne Duncan’s response to a question from NBC’s Matt Lauer on what would be the single most important game changer to address America’s educational challenges. Duncan stated that the ultimate change should be on delivering a world class early childhood education, Pickler noted.

The three day Education Nation event took place October 6-8 at the New York City public library.

 

Joetta Sack-Min|October 9th, 2013|Categories: Board governance, Conferences and Events, Governance, School Board News, School Boards, School Reform|Tags: , , , , |
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