Articles tagged with child nutrition

Let’s Move!, more than just a White House initiative

1-1256217176zbgkIt’s always quite hard to find someone who isn’t on a prescriptive diet, watching their weight, or at least trying to make healthy food choices. While much has been made of the fact that the nation as a whole is fatter than it’s ever been, the good news is that we know a lot more about the effect of certain foods on our bodies and can use that information to make healthier choices and (hopefully) lifelong habits for ourselves and our children.

The August issue of ASBJ focuses on childhood obesity and new research that shows the eating and exercise habits we learn in childhood influence the rest of our lives. The current generation of students is not only the heaviest, it’s the first whose life expectancy is expected to be shorter than their parents.

What’s the role of the school board? While some board members don’t feel it’s their job to police school cafeteria lines and meddle with what parents are feeding their children, there’s a role in teaching students healthy eating and exercise habits—part of the whole child movement–and it starts with healthier fare in the cafeteria. (Keep in mind, too, that these days more children are living in poverty and are relying on school meals as their main food source).
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Naomi Dillon|July 20th, 2010|Categories: American School Board Journal, Policy Formation, Wellness|Tags: , , |

Celebrity chef goes to Congress, lobbies for improvement in child nutrition

Rachael Ray is famous for her perky personality and 30-minute meals on Food Network. But the issue of childhood hunger brought her to Capitol Hill today, and the affable TV talk-show host was optimistic but serious as she stood outside the Capitol to promote a new bill that requires schools to serve healthier foods.

Leaders of the House Education and Labor Committee invited Ray to D.C., where she spoke at a press conference to introduce the “Improving Nutrition for America’s Children Act,” a bill to reauthorize the 1965 Child Nutrition Act. That law does not include the school lunch program but controls almost all other foods students eat at school and after-school programs.

“I really think that teaching a child good nutrition and the basics of cooking gives them the skills they need for self esteem and security for the rest of their lives,” Ray said. “Just being able to eat a nutritious meal really improves the quality of your life.”

Ray went on to say that good nutrition does more than keeping students focused in class, instilling healthy habits at an early age helps cut health-care costs and helps them learn to choose healthier options, particularly if they are short on money.
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Naomi Dillon|June 10th, 2010|Categories: American School Board Journal, Governance, Policy Formation, Wellness|Tags: , , , |

Chef Ann Cooper has been called the renegade lunch lady for her relentless efforts at improving school nutrition one cafeteria at a time. We profiled her in the Upfront section of our June 2008 edition of ASBJ, which was devoted to the important topic of child nutrition. Cooper recently took her message to a larger audience, filming a spot for Kashi’s Grains of Change campaign. Check it out:

Naomi Dillon|July 13th, 2009|Categories: American School Board Journal, Student Achievement|Tags: , , |
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