Articles tagged with Jr

Stand Up 4 Public Schools unveils Magic Johnson ads

A new “Stand Up 4 Public Schools” ad featuring legendary basketball star Earvin “Magic” Johnson, Jr. debuted today in Businessweek magazine.2014-201_nsbaStandUp_JohnsonAd.indd

Stand Up 4 Public Schools is the National School Boards Association’s (NSBA) public advocacy campaign that celebrates the good things happening in public schools. In the ad, Johnson notes, “Who I am today began with public education,” the campaign tagline.

He also states, “I developed a strong work ethic at home in Lansing, Mich. My father was an assembly worker and my mother was a school custodian. I developed my mind and body at public school—that’s where the ‘Magic’ began.”

The ad, along with several other versions featuring Johnson, is downloadable at the Stand Up 4 Public Schools website. Other celebrity spokespersons include Khan Academy founder Sal Khan and television host and actor Montel Williams.

Johnson spoke about the campaign and the importance of public education earlier this month at NSBA’s Annual Conference in New Orleans. Watch a video of the presentation and a question-and-answer session with NSBA Executive Director Thomas J. Gentzel on NSBA’s You Tube channel.

Aside from his professional basketball career with the Los Angeles Lakers, Johnson also is considered the most successful African-American businessman in our nation. Having left the basketball court for the boardroom, Johnson is Chairman and CEO of Magic Johnson Enterprises (MJE), which provides high-quality products and services that focus primarily on ethnically diverse and underserved urban communities through strategic alliances, investments, consulting and endorsements.

His business portfolio includes: ownership of the Los Angeles Dodgers of Major League Baseball and the WNBA team Los Angeles Sparks; a $500 million private equity fund; ASPIRE, an African-American television network; MAGIC Workforce Solutions, a staffing company, and SodexoMAGIC, a food service and facilities management company, among many other entities.

His philanthropic work includes the Magic Johnson Foundation, which he founded in 1991 to develop and fund programs addressing HIV/AIDS prevention, HIV testing, and effective treatment for persons living with HIV/AIDS. It runs five HIV/AIDS Clinics that assist all patients regardless of their ability to pay and have tested more than 40,000 individuals.

The foundation also runs a scholarship program that currently has 160 students. It also helps fund and build Community Empowerment Centers to help bridge the education gap by providing ethnically diverse urban communities access to resources and programming that educate, empower and strengthen individuals through the innovative use of technology. Currently there are 18 empowerment centers.

 

Joetta Sack-Min|April 25th, 2014|Categories: Announcements, Public Advocacy, Student Achievement|Tags: , , , , , , |

U.S. Supreme Court affirmative action ruling hampers diversity policies, NSBA says

The National School Boards Association (NSBA) is concerned that the U.S. Supreme Court ruling on affirmative action will embolden groups opposing diversity to push for state constitutional proposals that could restrict or invalidate local school board-initiated policies that help facilitate diversity in public schools.

By upholding a Michigan constitutional amendment that bans the use of racial preferences in college admissions, the Supreme Court’s decision in Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action on April 22, could limit school districts from adopting diversity policies by prohibiting the consideration of race and other factors in public education.

“The academic goal of diversity benefits all students, not just racial or ethnic minorities,” said NSBA Executive Director Thomas J. Gentzel. “Diversity promotes student achievement both through improvement on standardized test scores in the short term and as preparation for participation in a pluralistic, democratic society.”

NSBA had urged the U.S. Supreme Court to strike down Michigan’s Constitutional amendment in an amicus brief in the Schuette case . NSBA argued that instead of protecting the rights of public school students, the ill-conceived Michigan amendment would limit students’ opportunities by interfering with local control of education and local school boards’ abilities to design voluntary policies promoting the academic benefits of diversity.

“These kinds of state constitutional amendments will limit the use of race and therefore greatly limit the ability of schools to implement diversity policies that work,” said NSBA General Counsel Francisco M. Negrón, Jr. “We are concerned that in places that pass these kinds of constitutional provisions, public schools that want to maintain diversity policies will have to show that there is specific, invidious, or aggravating injury to minorities in order for those policies to pass a constitutional test.”

Negrón noted that school diversity policies can still exist under the Schuette ruling as long as they comply with the 2007 Supreme Court ruling in Parents Involved in Community Schools v. Seattle School District No. 1, which stipulated that policies must be narrowly tailored to achieve academic benefits for all students.

Read more details about the ruling in NSBA’s Legal Clips.

Alexis Rice|April 23rd, 2014|Categories: Diversity, School Boards, School Law|Tags: , , , , , |

DOJ official joins NSBA panel to discuss school diversity ruling

The National School Boards Association’s (NSBA) legal department announced that Anurima Barghava, Chief of the Educational Opportunities Section of the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), will join its webinar to discuss the Supreme Court’s recent ruling in Fisher v. Univ. of Texas. The webinar will be held Tuesday, July 16 at 1 p.m. EDT.

Ms. Barghava and other national experts, including NSBA General Counsel Francisco M. Negrón, Jr., will offer unique insights on the Supreme Court’s June 24 Fisher decision, which addressed the University of Texas’ use of race or ethnicity in its evaluation of candidates for admission. NSBA joined The College Board in an amicus brief in the case, arguing that the Court should avoid any dilution of the 2003 Grutter v. Bollinger ruling that would undermine efforts to achieve diversity currently used throughout the spectrum of our public education system from kindergarten through post-secondary levels.

Now that the Court has weighed in, leaving Grutter undisturbed for now, will Fisher change the way public schools admit and assign students? Does this decision signal the Court’s likely direction in Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action, where it will address a Michigan voter initiative that banned racial preferences in admissions to the state’s public universities? Will Fisher affect K-12 assignment policies designed to promote diverse public school enrollment? Is this decision consistent with the DOJ and Office of Civil Right’s interpretation of PICS?

Other panelists include Teresa E. Taylor, Policy and Legal Advisor, EducationCounsel LLC and co-author of the amicus brief filed by The College Board and NSBA; and John Borkowski, Partner, Hogan Lovells, who advises school districts across the country on constitutional issues including race and diversity.

Register Now to Reserve Your Seat!

 

 

Joetta Sack-Min|July 15th, 2013|Categories: Announcements, Council of School Attorneys, Diversity, Federal Advocacy, School Law|Tags: , , , , , |

Supreme Court rules in employment case and cites NSBA’s brief

The U.S. Supreme Court has favorably cited the National School Boards Association’s (NSBA) amicus brief in support of an important ruling that protects employers from lawsuits because of unwarranted claims of retaliation.

The June 24 ruling in University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center v. Nassar overrules a judgment by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit that created a higher standard for employers defending unsupported claims of retaliation.

Writing for the Court, Justice Anthony Kennedy cited NSBA’s amicus brief for the proposition that it would be against the intent of federal anti-discrimination laws to place economic and reputational costs on employers who did not discriminate.

The decision is particularly relevant for school districts because they often assign or transfer employees to improve teaching and learning and comply with federal and state mandates, and those actions can elicit lawsuits based on a perception of retaliation, NSBA noted in its brief.

“We are gratified that the Supreme Court views NSBA’s amicus briefs as a credible and important asset in its decision-making, particularly when those decisions bear greatly on the ability schools to carry out their educational mission,” said NSBA Executive Director Thomas J. Gentzel.

In its amicus brief, NSBA argued that a ruling to change the legal standard would have a severe impact on school district across the country and their more than 6 million employees, encouraging more lawsuits and stifling school leaders’ abilities to make decisions related to employee assignments.

“The Supreme Court has struck the right balance,” said NSBA General Counsel Francisco M. Negrón, Jr. “Anti-discrimination laws should not become a shield used by substandard employees seeking to invalidate legitimate employer action for poor performance.”

For more details about the case, see the article in NSBA’s Legal Clips.

Alexis Rice|June 26th, 2013|Categories: School Boards, School Law, Student Engagement|Tags: , , , , , , |

NSBA featured on ABC’s 20/20 concerning student discipline

The National School Boards Association’s General Counsel, Francisco M. Negrón, Jr., was interviewed for this ABC News 20/20 segment, “Classroom Confidential: When Student Discipline Goes Too Far“, that aired on September 28, 2012.

Negrón was featured later in piece (at 04:57)  defending school safety and school resource officers and noted, “I don’t think there’s a public school to prison pipeline and I certainly don’t think the presence of school resource officers is somehow contribution to that.”

Alexis Rice|October 1st, 2012|Categories: School Security, Uncategorized|Tags: , , , , , |
Page 1 of 11