Articles tagged with professional development

NSBA’s 2014 Annual Conference offers new site visits, workshop opportunities

As you make your plans for the National School Boards Association’s 74th Annual Conference, be sure to carve out time for a pre-conference workshop, site visit or special luncheon event as part of your experience.

Preconference workshops will cover topics such as school law, school safety, curriculum and assessment, leadership skills, and other topics critical for school board members. These half-day and full-day workshops are a great opportunity to learn about an issue in depth.

The site visits show firsthand some of the latest education technology innovations, and you can interact with experts to find ways to replicate successful programs in your schools.

Listen to an inspiring speaker and meet colleagues from around the country at the luncheons and other meal events. Each of NSBA’s three caucuses, which examine issues facing African-American, Hispanic and Native American children, host meal events with premier speakers and information about their work.

Keep in mind that most of the site visits sell out—some months in advance–so be sure to book your optional tours and meal events now.

Here is a list of some of the offerings for site visits and meal events at the 2014 conference, to be held April 5 to 7 in New Orleans. Check the registration website for more information on pricing and details of each event.

Friday, April 4

  • Preconference workshops: Check the 2014 Annual Conference website for a comprehensive list.
  • Site visit: Louisiana Lagniappe (lan-yap)–Lagniappe means a little something extra, which is exactly what you’ll experience during your day in St. Charles Parish Public Schools, one of the state’s top districts. Visit a newly renovated, technology rich, community-oriented elementary school and immerse yourself in the Wetland Watcher experience, a nationally recognized service learning program for wetlands conservation managed by middle school students. After a taste of south Louisiana cuisine, conclude your visit at the district’s unique Satellite Center, where cutting-edge technologies create an authentic learning environment for students to work alongside actual clients as they explore future careers.

Saturday, April 5

  • Site visit: National World War II Museum–Much of today’s technology had origins in World War II. Learn how the National World War II Museum staff created education resources available to districts across the country that bring the science and technology of War II to life for students. Plus, hear the latest about the museum’s photo and oral history digitization project and efforts to involve students in the collection of oral histories in their hometowns.
  • Best Practices for School Leaders luncheon–Learn about leadership and district best practices with the winners of the 2014 Magna Awards, the American School Board Journal’s annual awards for school districts’ most innovative programs. Sponsored by Sodexo, the Magna luncheon celebrates the spirit of innovation and excellence in public education. Attend this special event and be inspired to take what you hear and learn back to your districts.

Sunday, April 6

  • National Hispanic Caucus of School Board Members Breakfast–Speaker Maria Hinojosa, anchor and managing editor of her own long-running weekly NPR show, Latino USA, and anchor of the Emmy Award-winning talk show Maria Hinojosa: One-on-One, has informed millions of Americans about the fastest growing demographic in our country. Throughout her career, she has helped define the conversation about our times and our society with one of the most authentic voices in broadcast.
  • National Black Caucus of School Board Members Luncheon–Speaker Wil Haygood , an acclaimed Washington Post reporter, journalist, and biographer, has explored the social and historical dynamics of this country as few modern chroniclers have done, in books, magazine articles, and award-winning newspaper coverage. His most recent project, The Butler, which stars eight Oscar-winning actors, is the story of White House butler Eugene Allen, who had served no less than eight presidents, from Harry Truman to Ronald Reagan.
  • Education Technology Luncheon, School 2.0: Building the Schools We Need–Chris Lehmann, Founding Principal of the Science Leadership Academy in Pennsylvania, will share his insights.
  • Site visit: STEM in Action — Pumping Up the Students! After Katrina, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers built the world’s largest pumping station. Tour this amazing structure and hear how the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is investing in science technology, engineering, and math (STEM) curriculum materials to engage your students and support the emerging field of Geomatics that combines high tech tools with remote sensing.
  • Site visit: Southeastern Louisiana University–Explore the wetlands by boat with the Southeastern’s Turtle Cove Environmental Research Station that provides educators and students with problem-based, real-world science learning opportunities. Experience firsthand how instruction must change to support next-generation science standards.

Monday, April 7

  • Site visit: Building for the Future: Going Green–After the devastation of Katrina, Global Green, in partnership with Brad Pitt, made a commitment to sustainable building as the city recovered. Tour the Holy Cross Project Visitor Center, a home in the lower Ninth Ward, to learn about its green elements and systems. Get ideas for your own district with a school visit that incorporates “green” strategies to support healthier classrooms, protect the environment, reduce carbon emissions, and save the district money.
  • Site visit: NOAA Tour–Tour the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), a federal agency focused on the condition of the oceans and the atmosphere, and discover the multitude of resources they have developed to support K–12 education. Plus, hear a presentation by school leaders about the technology policies and practices they put in place to successfully weather storms that have struck their districts.

 

 

 

Joetta Sack-Min|November 20th, 2013|Categories: Announcements, Conferences and Events, Data Driven Decision Making, Educational Technology, NSBA Annual Conference 2014, NSBA Recognition Programs, STEM Education|Tags: , |

New report finds teachers need more effective professional development to meet higher standards

Despite decades of research, teacher professional development is not adequately helping teachers to develop their students’ critical thinking skills and subject matter knowledge so that they can be ready for college and the workplace, a new report by the National School Boards Association’s (NSBA) Center for Public Education (CPE) finds.

Teaching the Teachers: Effective Professional Development in an Era of High Stakes Accountability,” reports that ongoing, dedicated time for collaboration and coaching is the most effective way to help teachers develop needed classroom skills, but most professional development exercises are one-time workshops that research shows have no lasting effect. An estimated 90 percent of teachers participate in some form of professional development each year, but the vast majority receive it in workshops.

“Effective professional development is a key factor in improving student achievement and better preparing our students for the challenges of the 21st century economy,” said NSBA Executive Director Thomas J. Gentzel. “We already see that public schools are facing greater accountability for their students’ learning, and now teachers in the states that implement the Common Core State Standards will be under intense pressure to teach their students critical thinking and problem-solving skills.”

The report notes that professional development that is ongoing, collaborative and connected to the teacher’s subject area produces the largest student gains. The biggest challenge for teachers, research shows, is implementing the skills they have learned in their classrooms.

The report also looked at effective practices and found that:
• Professional development is best delivered in the context of the teacher’s subject area;
• Working with a coach or mentor is shown to be highly effective;
• Although research on effective critical thinking strategies is lacking, teachers in some areas have established professional learning communities to create best practices and coach each other;
• Case studies show that some school districts may be able to reallocate spending to provide better professional development opportunities without spending significantly more.

Teachers’ time is the most significant cost consideration for effective professional development. Further, professional development is often one of the first areas cut in tight budget times.

“Teachers need embedded time for collaboration and support while they attempt to change their practices,” said CPE Director Patte Barth. “But time is money. When budgets are pinched, districts may be tempted to go with one-time workshops which cost fewer dollars. But a low price is still too high if there is no impact on student learning.”

Teaching the Teachers: Effective Professional Development in an Era of High Stakes Accountability,” was written by Allison Gulamhussein, a doctoral student at George Washington University and a former high school English teacher, who was a policy intern for the Center for Public Education.  View Gulamhussein’s analysis of this report in American School Board Journal.

Alexis Rice|September 10th, 2013|Categories: American School Board Journal, Center for Public Education, Center for Public Education Update, Reports, School Boards|Tags: , , |

NSBA’s Center for Public Education discusses professional development and teacher evaluation on Education Talk Radio

The National School Boards Association’s Center for Public Education (CPE) was featured on Education Talk Radio today. CPE’s Senior Policy Analyst Jim Hull was a guest on the show discussing CPE’s research on professional development and teacher evaluation.

Listen to the show:

Listen To Education Internet Radio Stations with EduTalk on BlogTalkRadio

 

CPE is a national resource for credible and practical information about public education and its importance to the well-being of our nation. CPE  provides up-to-date research, data, and analysis on current education issues and explores ways to improve student achievement and engage public support for public schools.

Alexis Rice|August 28th, 2013|Categories: Center for Public Education, Center for Public Education Update, Professional Development, School Boards, Teachers|Tags: , , , |

National school leadership organizations urge “adequate time” for Common Core implementation

States and school districts need adequate time, professional development, and the technical infrastructure to properly transition to the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and the assessment requirements, the National School Boards Association (NSBA) and the major organizations representing school administrators say in a joint statement on the issue.

“Strong educational standards can be an important tool for improving student achievement, but states and school districts must be well prepared to successfully implement the Common Core State Standards,” said NSBA Executive Director Thomas J. Gentzel. “For the standards to succeed, states and school districts must have the financial resources and the infrastructure to manage online assessments, and they must be able to provide school administrators and teachers with the professional development.”

NSBA, AASA (the School Superintendents Association), the National Association of Elementary School Principals, and the National Association of Secondary School Principals wrote the document. It notes that states and districts face “very real obstacles” to align their curricula with the new standards and administer the required tests.

“Getting this transition right can mean the difference between getting and keeping public and educator support for the Common Core or a loss in confidence in the standards and even the public schools, especially if as expected the first-year scores will disappoint,” the statement notes.

There are further technical challenges surrounding the online assessments, which are scheduled to be put in place in 2014-15–including bandwidth, infrastructure and professional development. The concept of online assessments is widely supported by educators, but the timeline “could derail the good work already in place through the CCSS and deny the assessments the opportunity to provide the same academic benefits,” according to the document.

Currently 45 states, the District of Columbia, four territories, and the Department of Defense Education Activity have adopted the CCSS. In supporting the development of the CCSS, NSBA believes that the standards should be adapted voluntarily by the states and not mandated as a condition for receiving federal education program funds.

Alexis Rice|May 29th, 2013|Categories: Budgeting, Educational Finance, Federal Programs, National Standards, Policy Formation, Public Advocacy, School Boards, Student Achievement, Teachers|Tags: , , , |

The importance of school board professional development

Check out the  Education Talk Radio show from Friday, January 13, 2012 with National School Board Association‘s Executive Director Anne L. Bryant discussing our upcoming 2012 Annual Conference in Boston and the importance of school board professional development and leadership.

Listen to internet radio with EduTalk on Blog Talk Radio
Alexis Rice|January 13th, 2012|Categories: Conferences and Events, Educational Technology, Leadership, Multimedia and Webinars, NSBA Annual Conference 2012, NSBA Opinions and Analysis, School Boards, Teachers, Technology Leadership Network|Tags: , , , |

Board training, development — an important part of your governance process

0710Cover_ASBJSchool’s out, summer’s on, and for many school board members the real work starts. I’m talking about board development, whether that means a board retreat to establish a mission statement and goals, a review to determine the district’s progress towards set goals, or workshops and courses to enhance and deepen knowledge on school governance and current issues.

Education is a dynamic and volatile field and the districts that navigate the changes best are the ones with leadership teams who understand the value of regular professional development and training, as I discovered in reporting for the July cover story for ASBJ.

“People aren’t born understanding the intricacies of school funding formulas, parliamentiary procedure, open meetings, and public records requirements,” Lisa Bartusek, NSBA’s associate executive director of state association services, told me. “Board training helps lay citizens get up to speed quickly with the practical knowledge to perform their role.”

In fact, this knowledge base is so important that 20 states currently mandate board training for newly elected board members and even ongoing training for sitting board members.
(more…)

Naomi Dillon|June 28th, 2010|Categories: American School Board Journal, Governance, Policy Formation|Tags: , |

How to get the teachers you want

Imagine you have a complex medical condition that requires the work of a top surgeon. Fortunately, you’re able to get an initial appointment, but arranging a date for surgery is more problematic.

“No, not Tuesday,” the scheduler tells you. “Dr. Welby does physicals on Tuesdays. And Wednesday he fills out insurance forms.”

No well-run medical practice would squander its most valuable asset — its physicians’ expertise — like that. But that’s what schools do all the time with their most valuable assets, according to a recent article by Frederick M. Hess, director of education policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute.

 Two weeks ago, I told you about a report by The New Teacher Project called The Widget Effect (Our National Failure to Acknowledge and Act on Differences in Teacher effectiveness) , which says that most teacher evaluation systems fail in distinguishing between average (and often, below average) teachers and exceptional ones.

Hess’s article in the summer issue of Education Next is called How to Get the Teachers We Want, but it might easily be called The Widget Effect, Part II, because, he says, schools do the same thing in failing to differentiate between most teachers and those with expertise in critical areas such as reading and mentoring at-risk youth.

“…Schools and school systems casually waste scarce talent by operating on the implicit assumption that most teachers will be similarly adept at everything.” Hess writes. “In a routine day, a terrific 4th grade reading teacher might give lessons in reading for  just one hour, while spending another five hours teaching other subjects in which she is less effective, filling out paperwork, and so on.”
(more…)

Naomi Dillon|June 23rd, 2009|Categories: American School Board Journal, Student Achievement|Tags: , , , , |
Page 1 of 11